News & Events

Past Events Archive

  • Czechoslovak Exile After 1948: Activities, Problems, and International Cooperation

    The exile after the coup in 1948 and the fate of Czechs abroad, who sought the return of freedom and democracy to their homeland, enslaved by the Communists, are an integral part of our modern history. However, this phenomenon is still neglected and the general public has only fragmentary information about it. Researchers are still unable to agree on the intensities of individual waves of emigration between 1948-1989. The most likely figure would be probably 250,000 people in total. The estimate of Czechoslovak State Security at the end of 1948 states 8614 refugees. Their first steps in the free world…

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  • Authoritarianism and Democracy: Austria, Germany and Europe, 1918-2018

    Sociologist Ralf Dahrendorf wrote in 1997 that “a century of authoritarianism is by no means the least likely prognosis for the 21st century”. Due to economic globalization and digitalization, changes in the realms of life and work are vast and far-reaching, with profound consequences for democracy. This development, however, is not new—a look at globalization from the end of World War I to post-1945 Europe reveals comparable crises. Bridging literary, historical, economic and technological perspectives, this two-day conference examines the successes, and failures, of democracies, and analyzes a possible return of anti-democratic trends, both in present-day Europe and internationally. Morning…

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  • The Question of Judeo-Arabic: Nation, Partition, and the Linguistic Imaginary: CMES Distinguished Visitor Lecture

    Professor Ella Shohat, 2018 CMES Distinguished Visitor, will deliver a lecture on “The Question of Judeo-Arabic: Nation, Partition, and the Linguistic Imaginary.” This lecture examines linguistic belonging as invented within national and colonial itineraries. More specifically, it explores the genealogy of the concept of “Judeo-Arabic language” and its axiomatic definition as a cohesive (specifically Jewish) unit separate from Arabic, and classifiable under the historically novel rubric of isolatable “Jewish languages” severed from their neighboring dialect/languages. Does the notion of “Judeo-Arabic” correspond to the designation by the speakers of that language themselves or rather to a paradigm influenced by post-Enlightenment Judaic…

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  • Authoritarianism and Democracy: Austria, Germany and Europe, 1918-2018

    Sociologist Ralf Dahrendorf wrote in 1997 that “a century of authoritarianism is by no means the least likely prognosis for the 21st century”. Due to economic globalization and digitalization, changes in the realms of life and work are vast and far-reaching, with profound consequences for democracy. This development, however, is not new—a look at globalization from the end of World War I to post-1945 Europe reveals comparable crises. Bridging literary, historical, economic and technological perspectives, this two-day conference examines the successes, and failures, of democracies, and analyzes a possible return of anti-democratic trends, both in present-day Europe and internationally. 10am-12pm…

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  • The Republic of Arabic Letters: Islam and the European Enlightenment

    In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a pioneering community of Christian scholars laid the groundwork for the modern Western understanding of Islamic civilization. These men produced the first accurate translation of the Qur’an into a European language, mapped the branches of the Islamic arts and sciences, and wrote Muslim history using Arabic sources. The Republic of Arabic Letters reconstructs this process, revealing the influence of Catholic and Protestant intellectuals on the secular Enlightenment understanding of Islam and its written traditions. Drawing on Arabic, English, French, German, Italian, and Latin sources, Alexander Bevilacqua’s rich intellectual history retraces the routes—both mental and…

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  • Making Immigrant Knowledge from Collective Memories: Watching the Process Unfold in Spain

    The voices and spaces of immigrants come together to form collective memories. This, in turn, constitutes an important basis of community knowledge. Evelyn Hu-DeHart reflects on this process with the example ofBarcelona, where she currently teaches about new Chinese immigrants. Her research examines the distant history of Chinese in the Spanish Empire, first in Manila in the 16th century, then in Cuba in the 19th century. Keynote Address for the Conference Migrant Knowledges: Concepts, Voices, Spaces on April 20 & 21, 2018 at GHI West, the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC.

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  • Professionalization Workshop: Job Application

    Workshop for PhD students in German who are interested in applying for academic positions

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  • Authoritarianism and Democracy: Austria, Germany and Europe, 1918-2018

    Sociologist Ralf Dahrendorf wrote in 1997 that “a century of authoritarianism is by no means the least likely prognosis for the 21st century”. Due to economic globalization and digitalization, changes in the realms of life and work are vast and far-reaching, with profound consequences for democracy. This development, however, is not new—a look at globalization from the end of World War I to post-1945 Europe reveals comparable crises. Bridging literary, historical, economic and technological perspectives, this two-day conference examines the successes, and failures, of democracies, and analyzes a possible return of anti-democratic trends, both in present-day Europe and internationally. 9:00…

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  • Post-Nazi Germany and the Myth of American Influence

    Drawing on the author’s recent book, Lions and Lambs: Conflict in Weimar and the Creation of Post-Nazi Germany (2017), this talk will challenge older explanations of postwar German liberal democratic reconstruction and offer a new interpretation rooted in under-explored sources from the Hitler era. Noah B. Strote is an Associate Professor of European History at North Carolina State University. He earned his PhD from the Department of History at UC Berkeley in 2011.

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  • Nation and State Vs. Europe: When the Sum of the Parts Is Larger Than the Whole, Oct 16

    Brexit, the endless crisis of the euro and the suspension of „Schengenland“ are the symptoms of renationalization. So is the rise of anti-European populism – even in Germany, the traditional engine of integration. As always in its 65-years history, the EU will muddle through. But for all of its resilience, …read more

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