Calendar of Events

News & Events

Calendar of Events

The Department of German hosts and co-sponsors a range of events throughout the year, including conferences, lecture series, and weekly/biweekly colloquia and social activities. See our Calendar of Events for the most up-to-date information.

 

  • “ ‘Global Mission’: Nazi Foreign Cultural Policy and the Goethe Society in Weimar”

    Bio: W. Daniel Wilson was professor of German at Berkeley from 1983 to 2005 and departmental chair for four years; he is now professor of German at Royal Holloway, University of London. He has published widely in eighteenth-century literature, culture, and politics, particularly on political, gender and sexuality in Goethe. His most recent books are Goethe Männer Knaben: Ansichten zur ‘Homosexualität’ (Insel, 2012), Goethes Erotica und die Weimarer ‘Zensoren’ (Wehrhahn, 2015) and Der Faustische Pakt: Goethe und die Goethe-Gesellschaft im Dritten Reich (dtv, 2018). In 2016 he was awarded the Raimar Lüst Prize of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

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  • Helke Sander's dffb Cinema, 1968 and West Germany's Feminist Movement

    Helke Sander was a key figure of the early dffb (Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin), where she studied between 1966 and 1969. Returning to her political organizing and her films of the era revises three crucial narratives: 1. it expands narratives about 1968 to include the establishment of feminism as part of it (The Tomatenwurf), which is often read as a 1970s phenomenon; 2. it expands narratives of cinemas of the late sixties to include feminist filmmaking; and 3. it shows how the seeds for her much better known filmmaking of the seventies were already visible thematically and formally in…

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  • Between the Money-Image and the Museum: Ulrich Peltzer’s Theory of the (Contemporary) Work of (Installation) Art

    Abstract: If money’s status as dominant medium guiding what Jochen Hörisch once called the ontosemiological framework of modern culture has really yielded to the empire of audio-visual media, then why is so much contemporary German literature still so obsessed with money? This presentation considers how one such example—Ulrich Peltzer’s 2015 novel Das bessere Leben, a work whose very title signals its investment in correlating being and meaning—has tracked the convergence of money and image in our contemporary moment but in so doing has also called literature’s powers of critical observation into question. By indexing the museum as a privileged space of aesthetic…

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  • Mosse Lecture: Ulrike Ottinger

    Filmmaker in residence Ulrike Ottinger presents an illustrated lecture discussing her approach to the visual design of her films, as well as her research methods for a nonfiction film project like Chamisso’s Shadow. https://bampfa.org/event/mosse-lecture-ulrike-ottinger See schedule on PFA website: https://bampfa.org/program/afterimage-ulrike-ottinger

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  • The Future of European Research via the lenses of the Horizon EU research and innovation programme 2021-2027

    Jekaterina Novikova, EU fellow at the Institute of European Studies at UC Berkeley and Innovation Policy Coordinator at the European Commission, will speak about Horizon EU, a European research and innovation programme. This talk will highlight the process of the preparation of the programme based on the lessons learned from the previous programs, its building blocks, key novelties, and priorities.

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  • 27th Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference: Affective Realisms

    Affective Realisms 27th Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference February 22-23   We often think of realism as a reactionary gesture, circumscribing all that is possible within the limits of the status quo – but recent developments in critical theory, philosophy, and literary studies have mobilized affect and reality in surprising new configurations. Scholars such as Eve Kosofsky-Sedgwick, Brian Massumi, Sarah Ahmed, Jane Bennett, and Mel Y. Chen have figured affect as something very “real” in itself, a non-subjective force that gives form to bodies at once material, social, and political. As contemporary theorists return to the question of realism after the…

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  • The Securitization of Migration and Racial Sorting in Fortress Europe

    These past two decades the European Union has been hit by two so-called “crises”: the financial or “Euro” crisis of 2008 and the 2015-2016 migration crisis. Whereas both crises have fed into euro-sceptic sentiments, it is safe to say that the response to the financial crisis at least seemed to be somewhat coordinated and uniform with EU member states coming together to reinforce the monetary union through powerful new instruments and sacrificed control over their banking systems to save the euro. The opposite has been true with regard to EU member states’ response to the so-called migration crisis. Driven by…

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  • Event Canceled: The Securitization of Migration and Racial Sorting in Fortress Europe

    These past two decades the European Union has been hit by two so-called “crises”: the financial or “Euro” crisis of 2008 and the 2015-2016 migration crisis. Whereas both crises have fed into euro-sceptic sentiments, it is safe to say that the response to the financial crisis at least seemed to be somewhat coordinated and uniform with EU member states coming together to reinforce the monetary union through powerful new instruments and sacrificed control over their banking systems to save the euro. The opposite has been true with regard to EU member states’ response to the so-called migration crisis. Driven by…

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  • Semiotic Circle of California: Thirty-Fourth Meeting

    9:30 Scott Shell (UC Berkeley): “Conventional Language, Poetry and Curse-Formulas in the Elder Futhark Period”   9:50 W.C.Watt (UC Irvine): “Sociosemiotics 101: Zombies”   10:10 Jing Ge (UC Berkeley) and Susan C. Herring (Indiana Univ., Bloomington): “Do emoji sequences have a basic word order?”   10:30 Thaddeus Martin (Modesto Junior College): “Translating Jaspers”   10:50 Winfried Kudszus (UC Berkeley): ”Descriptive Beyond Reason: Freud’s Metaparanoiac Archaeology“   1:10 Sarah Harris (UC Berkeley): “Incompatibilities Under the Lupe: Translating Gender in German and English”   1:30 Kate Carnell Watt (UC, Riverside): “Sociosemiotics 102: Zombies”   1:50 Mattie Scott (Oakland, CA): “Dzogchen and the…

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  • Of Pathogens and Humans. A Cultural History of the Policies on Epidemics in the Nineteenth Century

    In the nineteenth century, epidemics reached, for the first time in history, all inhabited continents. Globally spreading pathogens were an unintended side effect of a growing flow of people, animals and goods across state borders, imperial spaces and continents. “Of pathogens and humans” is an ongoing research project that analyzes reactions to increasingly mobile diseases in the American and British Empires from the 1850s to the end of the First World War. It studies practices as well as ideas guiding the policies on epidemics, thereby exploring a hybrid area at the intersection of various political fields, such as colonial, foreign…

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