Courses

Courses in German for Spring 2019

Courses Spring 2019 

German 1 (5) Elementary German I. Euba.
Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet two or five times a week. Prerequisite: German 1 is intended for students who have not previously taken courses in German.

Course Objectives:
This introduction to the German language focuses on the development of basic communicative competencies (spoken and written) while sensitizing students to the links between language and culture. Students will be able to understand and use high frequency vocabulary and basic grammatical structures and engage with a broad variety of texts from various genres, including poetry, news reports, songs, and the visual arts. 


German 2 (5) Elementary German II. Euba.
Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 1 semester of college-level German or equivalent.

Course Objectives:
This German language course continues the development of basic communicative competencies (spoken and written) while sensitizing students to the links between language and culture. Students will be able to understand and use high frequency vocabulary and basic grammatical structures and engage with a broad variety of texts from various genres, including poetry, news reports, songs, and the visual arts. 


German 3 (5) Intermediate German I. Topics in German Language and Cultural History. Euba
Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 2 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.

Course Objectives:
Embedded in the context of German-speaking regions, their history and culture, this course focuses on the development of communicative competencies (spoken and written), the expansion of vocabulary, and the review and practice of grammatical structures. Students will be guided towards more creative and analytical expression by engaging with texts from a variety of genres such as poetry, drama, news features, and the visual arts.


German 4 (5) Intermediate German II. Topics in German Language and Culture. Euba Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 3 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.

Course Objectives:
Embedded in the context of German-speaking regions, their history and culture, this course continues the development of communicative competencies (spoken and written), the expansion of vocabulary, and the review and practice of grammatical structures. Students will further practice creative and analytical expression by engaging with texts from a variety of genres such as poetry, short stories, essays, and the visual arts. 


German 100 (3) Introduction to Reading Culture. Dewulf
This course is intended to acquaint students with selected works from German cultural history and to familiarize them with various methods of interpretation and analysis. Required for all German majors. Fulfills the Letters & Science requirement in Arts and Literature or International Studies. Taught in German. Students with native fluency in German are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisite: German 4.  Readings and Discussions in German.


German 101 (3) Advanced German Conversation, Composition, and Style. Staff
Prerequisite: 4 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.

Objectives: Focusing on genres, this advanced level language course will help students to improve and expand on spoken and written language functions utilizing a variety of works from literature, journalism, broadcasting, fine arts and the cinema. The final goal is to enable students to participate in the academic discourse – written and spoken – at a linguistic and stylistic level appropriate for an advanced student of German in upper division courses. Readings and Discussions in German.


German 102A (3) Advanced Language Practice: German Kabarett PerformanceEuba
Prerequisite: 4 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.

Objectives: The analysis, discussion, adaptation and public performance of authentic texts from German Kabarett (i.e., comedic skits, political and social satire, parody, humorous poetry, etc.) will advance students’ language and interpersonal skills, while providing unique access to a significant dimension of German popular culture. Additional emphasis is put on aspects and practice of creative writing and German pronunciation and enunciation.

Students must be available for evening and weekend performances 4/23 through 4/28. Readings and Discussions in German.


German 148 (4) Topics in Narrative. Kudszus
“Madness and Dreams in Literary Formations”.  An in-depth examination of pivotal 18th to 20th century prose texts in Austrian, German, and Swiss literature with regard to intersections of madness & dreams. Texts will include Ludwig Tieck’s Der blonde Eckbert (1796), Georg Büchner’s Lenz (1836), E. T. A. Hoffmann’s Der Sandmann (1816), Friedrich Nietzsche’s Ecce homo (1888, selections), Sigmund Freud’s Die Traumdeutung (1900, selections), Franz Kafka’s Das Urteil (1912), Robert Walser’s Der Spaziergang (1917), Thomas Bernhard’s Gehen (1971), and Herta Müller’s Der Teufel sitzt im Spiegel (1991). Readings in German, all other course work optionally in English or German, lectures in German and English.


German 172 (4) German Dialects. Shannon
“German Dialectology”.  In this course we will examine questions of geographical and social variation within the German language. Among other things we will consider the differences between language and dialect, the division of German dialects and the history of German dialect study, various linguistic features (phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical) characteristic of the major German dialect are-as, and issues involving the use of dialect versus standard language in contemporary society. Our study of these topics will involve the use of dialect maps as well as actual dialect texts, both written and recorded. Of particular interest will be examining typological traits and variation within Continental West Germanic. Besides undergraduate students, interested graduate students are also welcome. In addition to regular readings and homework assignments, grades will be based on active participation and an exam or paper. Readings will include (portions of): S. Barbour & P. Steven-son, Variation in German, H. Löffler, Probleme der Dialektologie, and C. Russ, The dialects of modern German; and various articles and excerpts which will be available in the form of a course reader. Class materials (including PowerPoint presentations) will be posted on bSpace.  Readings in German and Discussions in English.


German 176 (4) German Cultural History in a European Context. Richter
“Youth cultures and youth movements in the 20th century”.  This seminar introduces youth cultures in 20th century German history and explores German youth organizations, practices and styles as entangled histories and transnational phenomena in contemporary cultural history. It will focus on central actors and historical developments from the long turn of the century around 1900 to the Berlin Republic. The seminar will start with a presentation of some pioneers of the history of childhood and youth and a discussion of age as analytical category. After an exploration of the organized youth movement before World War I and of the Weimar Republic, the seminar will focus on the Hitler Youth and on the minority of nonconformist teenagers in the “Third Reich” (Pirates, Swing Kids). We will discuss postwar youth cultures as sub- and countercultures, as consumer cultures and as popular culture after 1945 including secondary and primary sources such as sounds, films, leaflets, posters, fiction, photos and texts.  Readings and Discussions in German.


German 179 (3) A History of German Literature in 15 Poems.  Largier
In this course we will read German poems from the Middle Ages until today. In our conversations we will explore the poems in close readings; the historical moments as they are reflected in the poems; and the significant epochs, movements, and styles in the history of German literature. All readings are in German, class discussion will be mostly in German.