Courses

Courses in German for Spring 2020

Courses Spring 2020 

German 1 (5) Elementary German I. Euba.
(Taught in German)

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet two or five times a week. Prerequisite: German 1 is intended for students who have not previously taken courses in German.

Course Objectives:
This introduction to the German language focuses on the development of basic communicative competencies (spoken and written) while sensitizing students to the links between language and culture. Students will be able to understand and use high frequency vocabulary and basic grammatical structures and engage with a broad variety of texts from various genres, including poetry, news reports, songs, and the visual arts. 


German 2 (5) Elementary German II. Euba.
(Taught in German)

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 1 semester of college-level German or equivalent.

Course Objectives:
This German language course continues the development of basic communicative competencies (spoken and written) while sensitizing students to the links between language and culture. Students will be able to understand and use high frequency vocabulary and basic grammatical structures and engage with a broad variety of texts from various genres, including poetry, news reports, songs, and the visual arts. 


German 3 (5) Intermediate German I. Topics in German Language and Cultural History. Euba
(Taught in German)

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 2 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.

Course Objectives:
Embedded in the context of German-speaking regions, their history and culture, this course focuses on the development of communicative competencies (spoken and written), the expansion of vocabulary, and the review and practice of grammatical structures. Students will be guided towards more creative and analytical expression by engaging with texts from a variety of genres such as poetry, drama, news features, and the visual arts.


German 4 (5) Intermediate German II. Topics in German Language and Culture. Euba
(Taught in German)

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet five times a week. Prerequisite: 3 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.


German 101 (3) Advanced German Conversation, Composition, and Style. Staff
(Taught in German)

Prerequisite: 4 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.

Objectives: Focusing on genres, this advanced level language course will help students to improve and expand on spoken and written language functions utilizing a variety of works from literature, journalism, broadcasting, fine arts and the cinema. The final goal is to enable students to participate in the academic discourse – written and spoken – at a linguistic and stylistic level appropriate for an advanced student of German in upper division courses. Readings and Discussions in German.


German 102A (3) Advanced Language Practice: German Kabarett PerformanceEuba
(Taught in German)

Prerequisite: 4 semesters of college-level German or equivalent.

Objectives: The analysis, discussion, adaptation and public performance of authentic texts from German Kabarett (i.e., comedic skits, political and social satire, parody, humorous poetry, etc.) will advance students’ language and interpersonal skills, while providing unique access to a significant dimension of German popular culture. Additional emphasis is put on aspects and practice of creative writing and German pronunciation and enunciation.

Students must be available for evening and weekend performances 4/21-4/26/2020. Readings and Discussions in German.


German 103 (4) Introduction to German Linguistics. Shannon
(Taught in German; readings in German and English)

This course is intended to introduce students to the principles, methods, and results of the scientific study of the German language. It serves as the gateway course for the further study of German linguistics at the undergraduate level. The first part of the class will focus on the synchronic (i.e. non-historical) description of contemporary German, giving a survey of the various major fields of linguistics as they apply to German and highlighting some of the most characteristic features of the language. The second part of the course will concern itself with variation in German. This unit will consist of a brief thumbnail sketch of the historical origin of German and the development of the modern standard language as well as social and regional variation in contemporary usage. The semester will conclude with a short overview and sampling of German dialects, including songs and narrative texts. There are no prerequisites for this class and no prior experience with linguistics is presupposed. However, an advanced knowledge of German (at least German 4 level) is expected. Lectures will be conducted in German; students are encouraged to use German in discussion, but English is also permissible. There will be regular written assignments, a mid-term, and a final exam. Assignments will be written in German, but exams may be written in German or English. Readings will include Johnson & Braber (2008), Exploring the German language and Bergmann et al. Einführung in die deutsche Sprachwissenschaft (2005);  PowerPoint presentations, additional readings and various handouts will be available on bCourses.


German 108 (4) Literary Translation. Kudszus
(Taught in German)

Our focus will be the practice and theory of literary translation, primarily from German to English. Following their particular interests, participants will choose a text or a constellation of texts for their individual semester projects. These projects will be introduced in an oral presentation and develop into a semester paper which typically will involve the translation of (part of) a text and reflections on your own translational stance. Additionally, we will jointly work on translating a variety of texts throughout the semester.


German 156 (4) Literature in the Digital Age. Balint
(Taught in German)

The digital age has altered the way we read, write, think, spend time and money, experience the world, and relate to others. But how is literature affected by the profound changes that the digital era has ushered in? Asking this question, the course dedicates itself to the various effects of the digital age on literature and the literary field. The emphasis will be on themes, poetics, and media of digital writing; as well as on shifting notions of the literary itself. Topics include forms of microblogging such as Twitter and Instagram; aesthetic experimentation and/on social media; notions of digital authorship. In juxtaposing texts disseminated in various media and formats, the course also focuses on changing practices of reading and viewing. Finally, attention will be given to how digital communication affects non-digital literature. Most readings, assignments, and course discussions in German.


German 173 (4) Phonetics and Phonology in Modern German. Shannon
(Readings in German and Discussions in English)

This course is designed for students who want to improve their pronunciation while gaining an understanding of the sound structure of modern standard German. The course will focus on basic principles of phonetics (e.g. how sounds are produced), the sound system (phonology) of German—compared and contrasted with English—sound and symbol (letter) mapping, and basic phonetic transcription. We will practice the production of sounds in German as well as learn to discriminate between German speech sounds. In addition, we will consider briefly variation in German. By the end of the semester you will be familiar with the sound structure of German and how these sounds relate to various German varieties. There are no prerequisites for this class and no prior experience with linguistics is presupposed. However, an advanced knowledge of German (at least German 4 level) is expected. Lectures will be conducted in German or English, as the class prefers. Grades are based on the regular homework assignments, a midterm, and a final, plus class participation. Readings will include Christopher Hall, Modern German pronunciation: An introduction for speakers of English and/or Mary Grantham O’Brien & Sarah Fagan, German phonetics and phonology: Theory and practice.