Courses

Courses in German for Fall 2018

Courses for Fall 2018

Language Courses

Please note that all sections of German 1 through German 4 will still meet five hours per week, however at each level we are introducing sections that will meet three days per week, rather than five days per week.

German 1 (5) Elementary German I. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. All four foreign language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) are addressed to help students acquire communicative competence in the German language while being sensitized to the links between language and culture. German 1 is for students with no prior knowledge of German.


German 2 (5) Elementary German II. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. In German 2, students will continue to develop communicative competence in the German language and expand their sensitivity toward the relationship between language and culture. While all language skills will be addressed, additional emphasis will be on the various styles of written and spoken German. Prerequisite: German 1 or equivalent.

Fall/Spring. Taken on S/U basis. Prepares graduate students from other disciplines to take their German reading exams. One year of German should be taken before 1G; 1G or consent of instructor is required for 2G. Students who will take 2G should enroll in it at the beginning of the semester; 2G will begin in approximately the eighth week of instruction. All students interested in the G courses should attend the first meeting of the semester.


German 3 (5) Intermediate German I. Topics in German Language and Cultural History. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. While continuing to expand students’ communicative competence in German, this content-driven course will provide insights into postwar German history and cultural trends. The primary focus will be on the development of literacy skills (critical reading and writing), vocabulary expansion, and a thorough review of structural concepts. Students will be guided toward expressing themselves on more abstract topics, such as language and power in society, multiculturalism, rebellion and protest, and social justice, and toward drawing connections between texts and contexts by using a variety of text genres (journalistic, historical, short story, poetry, drama, advertising, film).


German 4 (5) Intermediate German II. Topics in German Language and Culture. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. In this fourth-semester German language course, students work on strengthening their interpretative abilities as well as their written and oral forms of expression. While continuing the development of communicative competence and literacy skills, students will discuss a variety of texts and films and try to find innovative ways in which to engage with familiar presuppositions about who we are, about what determines our values and actions, and about the function and power of language.


German 100 (3) Introduction to Reading Culture. Dewulf
This course is intended to acquaint students with selected works from German cultural history and to familiarize them with various methods of interpretation and analysis. Required for all German majors. Fulfills the Letters & Science requirement in Arts and Literature or International Studies. Taught in German. Students with native fluency in German are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisite: German 4.


German 101 (3) Advanced German Conversation, Composition, and Style. Euba
Focusing on five central themes, this advanced-level language course will help students improve and expand on spoken and written language functions utilizing a variety of works from different genres in journalism, broadcasting, literature, fine arts, and cinema. The final goal is to enable students to participate in the academic discourse (written and spoken) to a linguistic and stylistic level appropriate for advanced students of German in upper division courses. Fulfills the Letters & Science breadth requirement in Arts and Literature or International Studies. Taught in German. Students with native fluency in German are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisite: German 4.


German 102D (3) Advanced Language Practice: Popular Culture in Germany. Stirner
This course explores German popular culture from the last 30 years through various media, including literature, music, performance art, blogs, and movies. What was “popular” in the last three decades in German speaking countries? What is German “Pop-Kultur”? What is the relationship between specific subcultures and pop culture? How are ethnic identity, regional identity, gender, or religion reflected in popular culture—and how do they shape it? And how do we define subculture, popular culture, and pop culture in the first place? With a strong focus on—but not limited to—the city of Berlin, readings and viewings take us from the electronic music scene to poetry slams, from queer punks in the GDR to Russian-Jewish immigrants in Germany after the reunification, from “Popfeminismus” to “Leitkulturdebatte.” Since this course is dedicated to advanced language practice, attendance and participation are crucial. Students will learn to analyze and reflect on popular culture and its history and role in contemporary German speaking countries—in German. Students are required to actively engage in class discussions, participate in group projects, submit regular writing exercises, and commit to independent media research.  Taught in German. Students with native fluency in German are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisite: German 4.


German 103 (3) Introduction to German Linguistics. Shannon
This course provides students with an overview of the major subfields of linguistics as they apply to German. It also serves as the gateway course for further undergraduate study of German(ic) linguistics. We will mainly focus on the basic concepts and methods in linguistic analysis of the contemporary language. After that we will consider variation in German: historical change, dialect differences. There are no prerequisites and no prior experience with linguistics is presupposed. However, an advanced knowledge of German (at least German 4 level) is expected. Taught in German; readings are in German and English. Required course for German majors, minors.


German 105 (3) Middle High German. Tennant
Students will learn the fundamentals of Middle High German grammar and will read selections from major narrative works of the High Middle Ages. Selections from major works from the 13th century. Taught in English, readings in German.


German 156 (4) Literature in the Digital Age.  Balint
This course examines the effects of the digital age on literature. Emphasis will be on themes, poetics, and media of digital writing; as well as on shifting notions of the literary itself. Topics include forms of microblogging such as Twitter and Instagram; aesthetic experimentation and/on social media; notions of digital authorship; practices of reading and viewing; literary scholarship and digital media. Readings, discussions, and coursework in German.