Courses

Fall 2019

Courses for Fall 2019

Language Courses

Please note that all sections of German 1 through German 4 will still meet five hours per week, however at each level we are introducing sections that will meet three days per week, rather than five days per week.

German 1 (5) Elementary German I. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. All four foreign language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) are addressed to help students acquire communicative competence in the German language while being sensitized to the links between language and culture. German 1 is for students with no prior knowledge of German.


German 2 (5) Elementary German II. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. In German 2, students will continue to develop communicative competence in the German language and expand their sensitivity toward the relationship between language and culture. While all language skills will be addressed, additional emphasis will be on the various styles of written and spoken German. Prerequisite: German 1 or equivalent.


German 3 (5) Intermediate German I. Topics in German Language and Cultural History. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. While continuing to expand students’ communicative competence in German, this content-driven course will provide insights into postwar German history and cultural trends. The primary focus will be on the development of literacy skills (critical reading and writing), vocabulary expansion, and a thorough review of structural concepts. Students will be guided toward expressing themselves on more abstract topics, such as language and power in society, multiculturalism, rebellion and protest, and social justice, and toward drawing connections between texts and contexts by using a variety of text genres (journalistic, historical, short story, poetry, drama, advertising, film).


German 4 (5) Intermediate German II. Topics in German Language and Culture. Euba in charge.

Fall/Spring. Five units; classes meet three or five times a week. In this fourth-semester German language course, students work on strengthening their interpretative abilities as well as their written and oral forms of expression. While continuing the development of communicative competence and literacy skills, students will discuss a variety of texts and films and try to find innovative ways in which to engage with familiar presuppositions about who we are, about what determines our values and actions, and about the function and power of language.


German 100 (3) Introduction to Reading Culture. Balint
This course is intended to acquaint students with selected works from German cultural history and to familiarize them with various methods of interpretation and analysis. Required for all German majors. Fulfills the Letters & Science requirement in Arts and Literature or International Studies. Taught in German. Students with native fluency in German are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisite: German 4.


German 101 (3) Advanced German Conversation, Composition, and Style. Euba
Focusing on five central themes, this advanced-level language course will help students improve and expand on spoken and written language functions utilizing a variety of works from different genres in journalism, broadcasting, literature, fine arts, and cinema. The final goal is to enable students to participate in the academic discourse (written and spoken) to a linguistic and stylistic level appropriate for advanced students of German in upper division courses. Fulfills the Letters & Science breadth requirement in Arts and Literature or International Studies. Taught in German. Students with native fluency in German are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisite: German 4.


German 102D (3) Advanced Language Practice: Popular Culture in Germany. Teupert
In Germany, pop culture is the object of ongoing and heated debates. While some critique it as the epitome of consumerism, others celebrate its utopian promises. Does pop manipulate the masses or does it imagine a democratic community? Is pop aesthetics superficial or political? What is the role of pop in daily life and how is it shaped by German history? We will pursue these and related questions in exemplary studies of German pop in literature, music, art, theater, television, and new media. Additionally, we will trace the media of pop discourse from the first Spex magazine in 1980 to the queer Sigessäule and twitter-feminism today. The objective of this class is to learn how to observe, analyze, and critique contemporary pop phenomena. For this purpose, we will work on a collaborative blog that documents students’ works in writing, photography, and other media of choice. Students are required to actively engage in class discussions, submit regular written assignments, and commit to independent media research. Film screenings and a visit to SFMoMA are obligatory.  Taught in German. Students with native fluency in German are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisite: German 4.


German 140 (4) Romanticism. Kudszus

An in-depth study of key works of Romanticism. We will explore visions and nightmares, dreams and madness, as well as creative reconfigurations of oneself and others. Our readings will include novellas, philosophical & novelistic fragments, Grimm fairy tales, and poetry. Readings in German, all other course work optionally in English or German, lectures in German and English.