Courses

Summer Courses

GERMAN 1: Elementary German.  Carlsson, I.

MTWT 9-12P, DWINELLE 206

Class Number: 12179

Units/Credit: 5

Session A: May 26 – July 2

 

GERMAN 2: Elementary German.  Krueger, M.

MTWT 9-12P, WHEELER 103

Class Number: 12180

Units/Credit: 5

Session D: July 6 – August 14

                          

GERMAN R5B sec.001: Reading and Composition –Harris, S.

TuWTh 3-5:30P, DWINELLE 206

Class Number: 13660   

Units/Credit: 4

Session D: July 6 – August 14

Description:
“Only Human: Science Fiction and Us”.  Millions turn to science fiction (sci-fi) for a break from their reality, whether in dystopian novels, alternate history videogames, films about robotic uprisings like The Terminator, or utopian space exploration series like Star Trek. Though it can be enjoyed purely as entertainment, sci-fi also enables a deeper analysis of taboo or uncomfortable topics by creating distance from the readers’ or viewers’ experiences. By setting a story in a strange world – whether a voyage to space, a parallel reality, or one impacted by a life-changing technology – sci-fi explores themes much closer to home, such as class, race, gender, and morality, and has historically served as a medium of social commentary, allowing authors to critique governments, oppressive regimes, and social norms under the cover of fiction. In texts ranging from Frankenstein to Black Mirror, this course examines classic sci-fi tropes including monsters, AI, and androids to examine how the far-flung stories of sci-fi can help us better understand ourselves.

 

GERMAN R5B sec.002: Reading and Composition- Shell, S.

TuWTh 3-5:30P, DWINELLE 206

Class Number: 12181

Units/Credit: 4

Session A: May 26 – July 2

Description: 

“Language and worldview in light of Germanic mythology”.  The primary purpose of this course, which fulfills the second component of the Reading and Composition Requirement, is to help students develop college-level skills in critical reading and academic writing. We will conduct close reading and analysis of texts, and the writing of clear and persuasive arguments. Subsequently, we will write a series of essays in which will be dedicated to general topics in grammar, rhetoric, and style.

In this course, we will use many major texts such as the Poetic Edda, the Prose Edda, the HêliandVölsunga Saga and Das Nibelungenlied. In addition to this selection, we will also include fragments, e.g., laws against paganism, place names, and the Germanic pluralistic idea of a “soul”, that will help to provide clues to the ancient Germanic religions and myths and their worldview. We will further explore these issues by researching the Christianization of the Germanic tribes and the degree of language contact within the migration period. When reading these texts, we will ask such questions as: how are thought, identity, and culture influenced by language and vice-versa? While the linguistic culture may not be the only focus, we will debate this topic heavily.  

 

GERMAN R5B sec.003: Reading and Composition – Feinberg, V.

TuWTh 10-12:30P, DWINELLE 246

Class Number: 12182   

Units/Credit: 4

Session D: July 6 – August 14

Description:

“Encounters with the Uncanny”
In this course we will explore Freud’s notion of the ‘uncanny’ in literature, film, and every-day life. According to Freud, the uncanny “belongs to the realm of frightening, of what evokes dread and fear.” Yet, he noted, it arises from “something that was long familiar to the psyche and was estranged from it only through being repressed.” Using his 1919 essay as a steppingstone, students will acquaint themselves with the most common examples of the uncanny (the ‘double’, or ‘Doppelgänger’; lifelike dolls and automatons, telepathy and other supernatural phenomena) and will be challenged to identify these motif in the works of authors such as E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Daphne du Maurier, as well as in films like Vertigo (1958), Eyes without a Face (1960), and Westworld (1973).

 

GERMAN R5B sec.004: Reading and Composition- Salehi, K.

TuWTh 10-12:30P, Dwinelle 106

Class Number: 12183   

Units/Credit: 4

Session A: May 26 – July 2

Description:

“Red Germany”.  Germany, the self-anointed land of poets and thinkers, is the birthplace of communism. This course will survey the legacy of communism in German literature and culture, from Karl Marx’s famous 1848 manifesto through the tumultuous first half of the 20th century and up to the end of the socialist project in East Germany. In addition to Marx himself, this R5B invites students to engage critically with literary and theoretical texts by such luminaries of Marxism and communism in the German tradition as the novelist Christa Wolf, the philosopher Theodor W. Adorno, the filmmaker Alexander Kluge, the political activist Rosa Luxemburg, and the poet and playwright Bertolt Brecht.

All readings and written assignments are in English. The primary purpose of this course, which satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement, is to help students cultivate the research, vocabulary, and argumentation skills necessary to write convincing academic papers.