Courses

Summer Courses

GERMAN 1: Elementary German.  Garcia, A.

MTWT 9-12P, ONLINE

Class Number: 13598

Units/Credit: 5

Session A: May 24 – July 2

 

GERMAN 2: Elementary German.  Blough, A.

MTWT 9-12pm, ONLINE

Class Number: 13599

Units/Credit: 5

Session D: July 6 – August 13

                          

GERMAN R5B sec.002: Reading and Composition – Salehi, K. 

TuWTh 3-5:30pm, ONLINE

Class Number: 13660   

Units/Credit: 4

Session A: May 24-July 2

Description:

Germany, the self-anointed land of poets and thinkers, is the birthplace of communism. This course will survey the legacy of communism in German literature and philosophy, from Karl Marx’s famous 1848 manifesto through the tumultuous first half of the 20th century and up to the end of the socialist project in East Germany. In addition to Marx himself, this R5B invites students to engage critically with literary and theoretical texts by such luminaries of Marxism and communism in the German tradition as the novelist Christa Wolf, the philosopher Theodor W. Adorno, the filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, the political activist Rosa Luxemburg, and the poet and playwright Bertolt Brecht.

All readings and written assignments are in English. The primary purpose of this course, which satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement, is to help students cultivate the research, vocabulary, and argumentation skills necessary to write convincing academic papers.

 

GERMAN R5B sec.003: Reading and Composition – Feinberg, V.

TuWTh 10-12:30pm, ONLINE

Class Number: 13601   

Units/Credit: 4

Session D: July 6 – August 13

Description:
“The Uncanny Self: Identity and Gender in Stories of the Fantastic”. 

In this course we will explore Freud’s notion of the uncanny and connect it to themes of identity and gender in literature and film. According to Freud, the uncanny “belongs to the realm of frightening, of what evokes dread and fear.” Yet, he noted, it arises from “something that was long familiar to the psyche and was estranged from it only through being repressed.” Using his 1919 essay as a steppingstone, students will acquaint themselves with the most common examples of the uncanny (the “double”, or “doppelganger”; lifelike dolls and automatons; telepathy and other supernatural phenomena) and will be challenged to identify these motifs in the work of authors such as Leonora Carrington, Amparo Dávila, Daphne du Maurier, and Shirley Jackson. With a special focus on female authors and protagonists, we will discuss how the uncanny, as a literary device, is used to address broader issues of gender inequality and identity conflict.

All readings and written assignments are in English. The primary purpose of this course, which satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement, is to help students cultivate the research, vocabulary, and argumentation skills necessary to write convincing academic papers.

 

GERMAN R5B sec.004: Reading and Composition- Harris, S.

TuWTh 10-12:30pm, ONLINE

Class Number: 13602

Units/Credit: 4

Session A: May 24 – July 2

Description: 

“Yesterday’s Future: Science Fiction and Modern Technology”.  Science fiction is enjoyed by millions each day, whether in novels like The Left Hand of Darkness, television series such as Star Trek or Westworld, or video games, including Detroit: Become Human. Although it can be appreciated purely as entertainment, this genre has additionally served as a method of social commentary, with creators using the distancing effect of foreign and fantastic settings to critique governments, oppressive regimes, and social norms under the cover of fiction. Set in an alternate reality – whether due to politics, climate change, or a life-changing technology – science fiction often examines themes in the real world, such as race, gender, class, and what it means to be human. This course will analyze science fiction tropes and modern technology, including CRISPR-Cas9, robots, and Deepfakes, to explore how sci-fi enables and provokes discussions of challenging and controversial topics.