Yael Chaver

Yael Chaver received her Ph.D. from U. C. Berkeley (2001) and works at the intersection of modern Yiddish and Hebrew cultures and literatures, with a particular interest in the Zionist Yiddish culture of pre-statehood Israel and in interwar European Yiddish literature and culture. She is the author of “What Must Be Forgotten: The Survival of Yiddish in Zionist Palestine” (2004, Syracuse) and its Hebrew version (2005, Yad Ben Zvi, Jerusalem). Her articles have appeared in “Jewish Social Studies,” “Yiddish” and “Prooftexts,” and she has presented at numerous international ...

Jon Cho-Polizzi

Jon Cho-Polizzi is a doctoral candidate in the joint PhD program in Medieval Studies and German Literature and Culture. He is also active in UC Berkeley's Program in Folklore and its Institute of European Studies. ...

Jeroen Dewulf

Jeroen Dewulf is associate professor in the Department of German, where he teaches courses in both German Studies and Dutch Studies. He is the current director of UC Berkeley's Institute of European Studies. As the incumbent of the Queen Beatrix Chair, he is also the director of the Dutch Studies Program. Since 2017, Dewulf is a member of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium. He is the founder and chair of both the Executive Committee of the Designated Emphasis in Dutch Studies and the Executive Committee of the Designated Emphasis in European Studies for graduate students. As an affiliated ...

Caroline Durlacher

Caroline is a graduate student in the German Literature and Culture program. Before coming to Berkeley, she received her BA in German Studies at Yale in 2015 and then worked as a translator in Vienna, Austria. Her interests lie, broadly, in the affective, imaginative or physiological effects of texts, in the rhetorical forms of their humor, their pathos, their propaganda or pornography. In practice, her work has focused on 18th-century German, French and English literature (Goethe, de Sade, Jane Austen), and on early-20th-century theory (Schmitt, Benjamin, Kraus).

Jarrett Dury-Agri

Jarrett Dury-Agri is a graduate student in the Department of German who comes to the field by way of literature. In 2012, he received a B.A. in Literary Studies from Middlebury College, where his culminating work considered the philosophical implications of Spanish translations of Franz Kafka’s short stories. After spending a year teaching English on a Fulbright Fellowship in Oerlinghausen, Germany, he studied German Expressionism and Italian Futurism at Dartmouth College, where he earned an A.M. in Comparative Literature in 2013. ...

Zachary Dziedziak

Zachary Dziedziak is a second year graduate student in the German Literature and Culture program and received his BA in History and German Literature from Columbia University. His research interests include the symbiotic relationship between literature and philosophy in fin-de-siècle Germany (especially Nietzsche and his influence on later writers) and the concomitant ‘crisis of modernity’ expressed in the literature of this period.

Nikolaus Euba

Selected as the AATG 2013 Post Secondary Outstanding Educator, Nikolaus Euba holds an M.A. degree in “Deutsch als Fremdsprache” from the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich. Before coming to California, he taught and coordinated German courses at Miami University (Ohio) and the University of South Carolina. At Berkeley, he directs the German Language Program and mentors the Graduate Student Instructors who teach language courses. His research interests focus on integrating (literary) texts into foreign language teaching and learning, a topic on which he frequently develops workshops ...

Justin Farwell

Justin Farwell is a PhD candidate in the Germanic Linguistics program. He received his BA in Scandinavian Studies from UC Berkeley and his MA in Germanic Linguistics from UC Berkeley. He is also a member of the Designated Emphasis in Dutch Studies. His research interests include linguistic typology, second language acquisition, spatial prepositions, grammaticalization, language contact theory, German dialectology, etymology, and lexical studies in older Germanic languages (namely Middle High German, Old English and Old Norse). ...

Vera Feinberg

Vera Feinberg is a graduate student in the Germanic Linguistics program. She received both her BA (2013) and MA (2015) in Linguistics from San Francisco State University. Her research has concentrated on socio-linguistic and cognitive linguistic aspects, primarily focusing on differences and similarities in lexical structure across languages. She is interested in the semantic analysis of German prepositions, particle and prefix verbs, and how insights of cognitive linguistic research can be applied to foreign language instruction.

Karen Feldman

Karen Feldman’s areas of specialization include hermeneutics and phenomenology, the Frankfurt School, German Idealism, literary theory and aesthetics. She received her B.A. from the University of Chicago (1989) and her Ph.D. from DePaul University (1998). Her current research concerns aesthetics and historiography from Kant to Benjamin. Prof. Feldman spent 2010-2011 in Berlin on a grant with the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. She was a Fulbright scholar at the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel and in Berlin (1998-2000); and a postdoctoral fellow at the Graduiertenkolleg ...

Michael Fragomeni

After spending 20 years in the music business, Michael returned to school, receiving his BA (magna cum laude) in History from UC Berkeley. He is currently investigating the freedoms and limitations of “artistic license” by fusing semiotics and optimality theory to examine language in the musical environment. In May of 2012, Michael received his MA in Germanic Linguistics.

Deniz Göktürk

Deniz Göktürk was born in Istanbul, graduated from Deutsche Schule Istanbul, studied in Konstanz/Germany, Norwich/UK, and Freie Universität Berlin, where she earned her Ph.D. in 1995. She joined the German Department at Berkeley in fall 2001, after having taught at the University of Southampton/UK for six years. Her publications include a book on literary and cinematic imaginations of America in early twentieth-century German culture: Künstler, Cowboys, Ingenieure: Kultur- und mediengeschichtliche Studien zu deutschen Amerika-Texten 1912-1920 (1998) as well as seminal articles on ...

Sarah Harris

Sarah Harris is a doctoral candidate studying Germanic linguistics. She received her BA in Linguistics from Dartmouth College in 2011 and her MA in Germanic Literature from NYU in 2014. Her interests include language and identity, specifically as it relates to inclusive language in German. Her dissertation concerns gender marking on persons, and how the grammatical requirements of German may affect women and trans individuals.

Carolyn Hawkshaw

Carolyn Hawkshaw is a PhD candidate in Germanic Linguistics. In 2004, she received her Bachelor of Music degree from McGill University (Montreal), where she majored in Musicology and studied piano with Canadian pianist Sara Laimon. She spent two years as a student at the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität in Freiburg (Breisgau), Germany, before enrolling in the Germanic Linguistics PhD Program at Berkeley in 2006. She completed the MA in Germanic Linguistics in 2008. Her research interests include historical German morphology (particularly nominal inflection), corpus linguistics, computational ...

Gerd Hillen

Professor Hillen studied German and English literature in Munich and Hamburg (Staatsexamen, 1960) and taught German at the University of Hong Kong from 1961 until 1963. His publications reflect his interest in the works of Grimmelshausen, Gryphius, and Lohenstein; the form and function of literary allegory; various aspects of the oeuvre of G. E. Lessing; and post-WW II literature, especially the novels of Max Frisch. His most recent research involves a review of interpretations of Lohenstein’s African dramas, Grimmelshausen’s picaresque novels, and questions regarding the methodology of ...

Paul Hoehn

Paul is a second year doctoral student in the German Literature and Culture program. In 2014, they received their B.A. in German Literature from Kenyon College, where their honors project focused on the interaction of urban/suburban space and personal identity in Arthur Schnitzler's Traumnovelle. They have also studied at the Freie Universität Berlin and spent the 2014-2015 academic year as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant in Meißen, Germany. Paul's research spans the 20th and 21st centuries with a particular focus on literature in the Berlin Republic. Their interests lie broadly at ...

Zainab Hossainzadeh

Zainab Hossainzadeh is a graduate student in Germanic Linguistics. She received her BA in Linguistics and minors in German and Latin from the University of California, Berkeley in 2013, and she received her MA in Germanic Linguistics, also from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2017. She is interested in translation studies and wants to examine translation across multiple modern and historical languages in the context of sacred/religious texts. She aims to incorporate computational approaches into her research.

Anton Kaes

After his 1973 Ph.D. from Stanford University, Professor Kaes taught Comparative Literature and Film at the University of California at Irvine, serving as Director of Comparative Literature from 1978 to 1981. In Berkeley since 1981, he was Director of the Film Studies Program from 1991-98 and Chair of the German Department from 2001-2006. He received a Distinguished Teaching Award in the Humanities at Berkeley in 2010 and is the recipient of a Rockefeller Foundation Humnities Research Grant (1978), an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Fellowhip (1984/85; 1986/87); a Guggenheim Fellowship ...

Claire Kramsch

After studying German Language and Literature in the 1950’s at the University of Paris-Sorbonne, Professor Kramsch emigrated to the United States, where she taught German language and literature at M.I.T. and Applied Linguistics at Cornell University. At UC Berkeley since 1990, she is now retired from the German Department and holds an appointment as Professor of the Graduate School. Her area of research is applied linguistics, with emphasis on social, cultural and stylistic approaches to language study. She was, until 2006, founding Director of the Berkeley Language Center, a research and ...

Molly Krueger

Molly Krueger is a graduate student in the German Literature and Culture program. She joined the department in 2017 after earning her BA in German from Bowdoin College in 2013. Her interests include German-Jewish literature and culture and the intersection of literary, visual, and material objects. She has also studied at the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, and spent several years working in Maine’s craft beer industry.

Winfried Kudszus

Professor Kudszus studied literature, philosophy, and psychology at the Universities of Zurich, Freiburg/Breisgau, and Munich. Ph.D. Berkeley 1968. Stanford faculty 1967, Berkeley faculty since 1968. Kudszus has held visiting and research professorships at various universities, and in a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary programs: Cornell University (Society for the Humanities); University of Tübingen (German Literature); University of Mainz (Research Professor at the Institute of Psychiatry); University of Frankfurt/Main (Sociology/Psychoanalysis); Latvian Academy of Culture, Riga: ...

Niklaus Largier

Niklaus Largier is the Sidney and Margaret Ancker Professor of German and Comparative Literature. He is affiliated with UC Berkeley’s Programs in Medieval Studies and Religious Studies, the Designated Emphasis in Critical Theory, the Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, and the Berkeley Center for New Media. Largier is currently working on two projects: a book on imagination, practices of figuration, aesthetic experience, and notions of possibility, tentatively entitled “Figures of Possibility;” and a book on the history of practices and the poetics of prayer ...

Adrienne Merritt

Adrienne (Damiani) Merritt began the journey into Medieval Studies at the University of Minnesota, completing coursework in Paleography, Medieval Text Editing, Latin, and several historical Germanic languages. At that university, she completed her bachelors in German and History, with a minor in Medieval Studies, as well as a Masters in the Germanic Philology program. Upon arriving at UC Berkeley in 2008, she has continued studies in all things medieval, but also pursued research interests in nineteenth and twentieth century subjects, in particular fin de siècle Viennese culture and ...

Adam Nunes

Adam Nunes is a graduate student in Germanic Linguistics and an alumnus of UC Berkeley. Graduating in 2013 with a B.A. in German and B.A. in Linguistics, he has come back to UC Berkeley after spending the last three years working for LendingClub.com as a Training and Development Associate.

Stephanie Peltner

Stephanie Peltner is a doctoral candidate in Germanic Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. She was born and raised in Germany. She did her undergraduate as well as her graduate studies at Berkeley, receiving a BA in Linguistics and German Studies in 2008 and a MA in Germanic Linguistics in 2011. Her research interests include language variation and change with a focus on aspect and tense. She is currently writing her dissertation about the correlation of aspect and tense in the past tense of irregular German verbs.

Irmengard Rauch

Irmengard Rauch. Ph.D. Michigan. Germanic Linguistics, historical (Gothic, Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Old/Middle/Early New High German) and contemporary (New High German, Modern German Dialects); Linguistic Fieldwork; Socio-cultural, anthropological, and cognitive approaches to language variation and language change; Contrastive Analysis and Linguistic Methodology; Linguistic Archeology; Paralanguage and Semiotics (how verbal and non-verbal languages signify). Since 1982 at Berkeley (previously at Wisconsin, Pittsburgh, Illinois). Author: The Phonology/Paraphonology Interface and the Sounds of ...

Landon Reitz

Landon Reitz has been a graduate student in the Department of German since 2015. He received his BA in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 and an MA in German Studies from UC Berkeley in 2016. He completed a Fulbright Teaching Fellowship in Munich and has worked in the field of higher education at UPenn. His primary research interest is medieval German religious literature especially pertaining to mystical thought, writings, and practice. His secondary interest include literary representations of reading, the history of German Studies in the ...

Isabel Richter

Isabel Richter is DAAD Professor at the Department of History and the Department of German. She is a historian in Modern German history focusing on cultural history and cultural anthropology. Her research interests include German and Western European cultural history (18th – 20th centuries), youth cultures in the 20th century, the history of death in modern Europe, cultural anthropology , material and visual history, National Socialism, and interdisciplinary gender studies.

Evelyn Roth

Evelyn Roth is an international graduate student at the German Department with an interdisciplinary academic background. She received her B.A. in Literature-Art-Media Studies from University of Konstanz, Germany in 2014 and expects a M.A. in Studies in European Culture with an emphasis on Digital Humanities in early 2017.

Alicia Roy

Alicia Roy is a graduate student in the UC Berkeley Department of German with a Designated Emphasis in Film & Media. She received her M.A. from UC Berkeley in 2014 and a B.A. in German Studies and Media Studies from Scripps College in 2011. She previously worked in Berlin at the Bundestag through the International Parliamentary Scholarship and in Hesse as a Teaching Assistant with the Fulbright Program. Her interests include Weimar cinema, science fiction, film copyright history, and cult television.

Laura Sacia Bonicatto

Laura Sacia Bonicatto received her PhD (2006) in Linguistics from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa after completing her undergraduate studies in English Language Pedagogy, Germanic Linguistics and English Linguistics at Justus-Liebig-Universität-Giessen, Germany (1998). She has previously taught at Stanford University, the University of San Francisco, the University of Hawai'i, Kobe Women's University (Japan), Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), and Palacky University (Czech Republic). She is a 2018-19 Lecturer Teaching Fellow with UC Berkeley's Center for Teaching and ...

Kumars Salehi

Kumars Salehi is a PhD student in German Literature and Culture. Broadly, he is interested in the relationships between media (primarily film, but also news media) and political consciousness. His research interests include Marxism; the Frankfurt School; German Idealism; and German and Scandinavian modernist/art cinema.

Michael Sandberg

Michael Sandberg is a graduate student in the German Literature and Culture program. He joined the department in 2017 after receiving his B.A. in Philosophy and German Studies from Vassar College in 2015. He is primarily interested in the interactions between old and new forms of media ("remediation") in the early 20th century and beyond. This includes visual culture (predominantly photography and film), the newspaper, and other new technologies that shift perceptions of space, "place" and time. Other interests include archive theory, architecture, and eco-criticism. He has also worked as a ...

Berenike Schierenberg

Berenike Schierenberg is an international graduate student in German Studies. After having been a visiting graduate at UC Berkeley in 2016/17, she joined the Department in 2018. She studied Comparative Literature and Art History at Free University in Berlin for her B.A. (2016) and her M.A. (expected spring 2019).

Tina Schrader

Tina Schrader holds an M.A. in German language and literature and pedagogy from the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a state degree (Staatsexamen) in German, French and Educational Science. After completing her teacher training in Hamburg, she taught at several schools and in the teacher education department of the University of Hamburg. Since moving to the US, she has taught German at Saturday Schools, Community Colleges and at the UC. She has a special interest in German Heritage Speaker education.

Julia Schroeder

Julia Schroeder is a graduate student in the Department of German at UC Berkeley. She received her BA from UC Berkeley and has also studied at the Freie Universität Berlin. Her academic interests include film/media, international relations and literature. Julia is passionate about learning in multicultural settings and looks forward to continuing her studies at UC Berkeley.

Hinrich C. Seeba

Born and raised in Hannover, Germany, Professor Seeba studied German, Greek and Philosophy at the universities of Göttingen, Zürich and Tübingen; he passed his Staatsexamen in 1966 and received his Dr. phil. in 1967, both from the University of Tübingen. He started teaching at Berkeley in 1967 and served twice as departmental chair, from 1977-81 and again from 1989-91. He was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1970/71 and visiting professor at the Free University Berlin in 1992, at Stanford University in 1994, and at the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, in 1999. He was chair of the Society & ...

Thomas Shannon

Thomas F. Shannon, Professor of Germanic Linguistics, member of the Dutch Studies Program faculty, and former director of the UC exchange program in Germany, has been in our department since 1980. He holds Master’s degrees in German (SUNY Albany) and Theoretical Linguistics (Indiana) and a Ph.D. in Germanic Linguistics (Indiana). His areas of specialization are modern German and Dutch, particularly syntax and phonology, and he has published widely on a variety of topics, including naturalness, syllable structure, complementation and control, ergative phenomena, passivization, perfect ...

Scott Shell

Scott Shell, a PhD candidate at the University of California at Berkeley, received an MA in linguistics in 2014 and is currently pursuing a PhD in Germanic linguistics. His interests are semiotics, runology, Germanic/Scandinavian mythology and historical linguistics.

Gregory Smith

Gregory Smith is a PhD student in German Literature and Culture. He received a B.A. in Germanic Languages and Literatures and Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As an undergraduate, he also spent a year in Jaipur studying the Hindi language and 20th century Hindi and Urdu literature. He also worked for two years as a translator and editor for a subsidiary of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung in Frankfurt am Main. His research interests include modernism and avant-garde studies; the intersections between body culture, cross-cultural mysticisms, and ...

Johan Snapper

Professor Snapper did his Graduate work in Germanic languages and literatures at the University of Chicago (M.A.) and the University of California at Los Angeles (Ph.D.). He specializes in eighteenth-century German literature and modern Netherlandic literature. In addition to his doctoral dissertation (on Friedrich Maximilian Klinger) his publications include six books and more than fifty scholarly articles. One of his monographs deals with the work of the controversial Dutch writer Gerard Reve, while his most recent study (The Ways of Marga Minco) is a book on the Dutch writer Marga Minco, ...

Chenxi Tang

Chenxi Tang studied comparative literature, German literature, and philosophy at Peking University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (MA 1993), and Columbia University (PhD 2000). He taught at the University of Chicago before joining the Berkeley faculty in 2007. Professor Tang’s research falls in three main areas: 1. German literature and intellectual history from the baroque to modernism. His dissertation “Writing World History: The Emergence of Modern Global Consciousness in the Late Eighteenth Century” and monograph “The Geographic Imagination of Modernity: Geography, ...

Marita Tatari

Marita Tatari is a Feodor-Lynen-Fellow (Humboldt Foundation) at the German Department UC Berkeley from February 2018 through July 2019. She received her PhD in Philosophy at the Marc Bloch University Strasbourg under the supervision of Jean-Luc Nancy with a dissertation on Heidegger and Rilke (2005) and her venia legendi (Habilitation) in Theater Studies at the Ruhr University Bochum (2017). The core of her Habilitation focused on the concept of action in Hegel’s Aesthetics. She situated this research in the context of German drama and performance studies, discussing the historicity of their ...

Elaine Tennant

Elaine Tennant, James D. Hart Director of The Bancroft LIbrary, is Professor in the Departments of German and Scandinavian and affiliated with the Program in Medieval Studies. She did graduate work at Harvard and the University of Vienna. Her main areas of research are Habsburg court society in the early modern period, development of the German language in the late Middle Ages, and the Middle High German narrative tradition. Her teaching has been concerned primarily with the literary and cultural traditions of the Holy Roman Empire in the medieval and early modern periods, although she also ...

Jonas Teupert

Jonas is a graduate student in the Department of German with a designated emphasis in Critical Theory. His dissertation project, tentatively entitled “Fugitive Forms,” investigates the interrelation between precarious mobility and poetic forms of reflection in 19th century German literature and philosophy. In this project, he argues that historically specific practices of writing translate movements of flight into textual forms allowing for a critique of nationalist modes of belonging. ...

Cara Tovey

Cara Tovey is a PhD student in German Literature with a Designated Emphasis in Film and Media. She received her BA in 2011 and MA in 2012, both in German Studies from the University of Cincinnati. Her research interests include the confluence of early cinema and German literature with performance studies in the early 20th century. She is currently writing her dissertation titled Life as a Dance: Lebensreform and the Promise of an Alternative Modernity on dance as a metaphor for how to live one’s life in the Lebensreformbewegung from the late 19th century through WWI to the beginning of the ...

Christine Vais

Christine Vais is a graduate student in Germanic Linguistics. She received her BA in 2011 from the University of California, Berkeley, with a double major in German and Linguistics. In 2014, she received her MA, also from the University of California, Berkeley, in Germanic Linguistics. ...

Tim Wells

Tim is a graduate student in the German department. He received his B.A. in philosophy from Bard College 2018, writing his senior thesis on Marx, Brecht, and Lenin. He is primarily interested in Marxist/Hegelian thought and the history/literature of the Weimar Republic. He is also interested in psychoanalysis, German theater and film, and the second world war.

Melissa Winters

Melissa Winters is a PhD candidate in German and Medieval Studies. She arrived in her current field by way of musicology: prior to beginning the doctoral program in German literature at UC Berkeley, she earned the MA and MPhil in music theory at Yale University and the BA in music at Mills College. Her dissertation, “Building the Hall of Song: Richard Wagner and the Middle High German Blütezeit,” examines Wagner’s reception of the courtly literary tradition of the thirteenth century. Those who wonder what she was doing in the interim between Yale and Berkeley may wish to know that she ...

Esmée van der Hoeven

Esmée van der Hoeven is lecturer in the Dutch Studies Program at the Department of German. She has an MA degree in Language and Culture Studies from Utrecht University (2004), and obtained a certificate in teaching Dutch as a Foreign Language from VU University Amsterdam (2006). She is experienced in teaching Dutch language courses on all levels and has a special focus on conversation practice and writing skills. Before she came to Berkeley, she has taught Dutch language and culture at Utrecht University, Palack‎‎ý University in Olomouc, Czech Republic, Delft University of Technology, ...