Conferences

Each year the graduate students of the department organize and host a two-day conference on a specific interdisciplinary theme. The conference offers students and faculty from the U.S. and abroad an opportunity to present their research on such diverse topics as: “Finite Subjects: Mortality and Culture in Germany” (2002), ”Self-Made Germans: Authenticity, Authority and Self-Fashioning” (2001), “The German Soldier” (2000), “Reading Turn-of-the-Century Culture at the Turn of the Century” (1999), “Building Memory: City Space and Urban Experience” (1998), and “Conquering Women: Gender and War” (1997). Our recent conferences have received great praise from faculty and students both at Berkeley and around the country. They familiarize students with all phases of the conference process and provide unique insight into what constitutes an effective abstract and academic presentation.

SPEAKING BETWEEN: LANGUAGE AND INTERSUBJECTIVITY

Eleventh Annual Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference
at the University of California, Berkeley
March 15-16

“Language is not simply means for understanding, but the impression of the mind and world-view of the speaker. [. . .] That is why the learning of a foreign language is the achievement of a new standpoint in the present world.”         -Wilhelm von Humboldt

When our personal narratives no longer intersect, due to the fragmentary, heteroglossic nature of identity construction in the postmodern era, how do we create community or a sense of it? What roles do language, ideology and power play in community formation? And how does the meaning-making subject interact with and through the semiotic systems of its communities? The graduate students of the German Department at the University of California at Berkeley welcome scholars from across the disciplines to engage in this theoretical discussion.

The conference will take place at the Townsend Center for the Humanities, 220 Stephens Hall.

For more information, please contact:

Tes Skogmo (PhD Student)
Department of German
University of California at Berkeley
5319 Dwinelle Hall, MC 3243
Berkeley, CA 94720-3243

Nation and Representation 2002

A Film Conference
UC Berkeley

MONDAY, 13 MAY, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., room 282 Dwinelle

III. Strangers in the Nation

  • Robert Peckerar: The Vampire Writes Back: Icons of Eastern European Jews
  • June Hwang: Locating the Wandering Jew
  • Joel Freeman: Death and the Grounds of Nationalism in Triumph of the Will
  • Alexander Klemm: Staging Racism in R.W. Fassbinder’s Fear Eats the Soul

IV. Staging Identities

  • Mariah Larsson: “An Impossible Homecoming”. Mai Zetterling’s Questioning of the Swedish Imagined Community
  • Meg Dahlgren: Nationalist Lampoon: H.J. Syberberg’s Parsifal
  • Mike Allan: Image and Nation at War:Harun Farocki’s Bilder der Welt und Inschrift des Krieges
  • Susanne Hoelscher-Whiting: Lola on the Run: Trafficking Identity in Synthesized Berlin

Sponsored by the Department of German and the Program in Film Studies, in conjunction with German 214/Film 240 (Profs. Deniz Göktürk and Anton Kaes).

Nation and Representation 2002

A Film Conference
UC Berkeley

MONDAY, 6 MAY 2002, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., room 282 Dwinelle

I. Colonial Contacts

  • David Gramling: F.W. Murnau’s Traffic in Tabu
  • Jim Ramey: Werner Herzog’s Representational Imperialism
  • Gerrit Hoche: “Long Arrows are Gaining Fashion”: Targeting the Colonial Gaze in Werner Herzog’s Aguirre

II. Mediated Travel

  • Richard Ascarate: Mirages of Documentary: Werner Herzog’s Fata Morgana
  • Darlene Pursley: Capturing Nostalgia: Video Images in the Films of Wim Wenders
  • Lee Roberts: Tokyo-Ga or Images of Germany? Mediated Memories of Forgotten Fathers
  • Johanna Jacobsen: Germans and Turks: Cinematic Encounters of the Travelling Kind

Sponsored by the Department of German and the Program in Film Studies, in conjunction with German 214/Film 240 (Profs. Deniz Göktürk and Anton Kaes).

The Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable meets biennially in even-numbered years. In 2002 it will meet on Friday and Saturday, April 5-6.

2002 BERKELEY GERMANIC LINGUISTICS ROUNDTABLE
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY PROGRAM

 Friday, April 5

  • 8:30 Registration (Faculty Club: Seaborg Room)
  • Morning Session: John H. McWhorter (UC Berkeley)
  •  9:00 Sang Hwan Seong (Univ. of Bonn): “Transitive Constructions and Prominence Typology in English, Dutch, and German”
  •  9:25 Gergely Toth (UC Berkeley): A Strong West Germanic MP Competitor: The Case of Hungarian”
  •  9:50 Anatoly Liberman (Univ. of Minnesota): “Some General Principles of Etymology”
  •  10:15 Lee M. Roberts (UC Berkeley): “When Form Defines Content”
  •  10:40 Roland Willemyns (Free Univ. Brussels): “Corpus Planning in 19th Century Flanders and its Consequences on Public Language Usage in the Administration”
  •  11:05 Caroline Féry (Univ. of Potsdam): “Information Structure: Intonation and Prosodic Structure in a Typological Perspective”
  •  12:00 – 1:30 Lunch
  •  Afternoon Session: Roland Willemyns (Free Univ. Brussels)
  •  1:30 Werner Abraham (UC Berkeley): “Pronomina im Diskurs: deutsche Personal- und Demonstrativpronomina unter Zentrierungsperspekitive: Grammatische Überlegungen zu einer Teiltheorie der Textkohärenz
  •  1:55 Jeremy Bergerson (Univ. of Minnesota): “The formative element -s in West Germanic”
  •  2:20 Suin Shin (UC Berkeley): “Why der E-mail or die Team sounds Odd: Gender Assignment of English Loan Words in German”
  •  2:45 Livio Gaeta (Univ. of Turin): “On the Relation between Primary and Secondary Umlaut”
  •  3:10 Dorian Roehrs (Indiana Univ.): “Case Fluctuation of Some Middle-reflexive Predicates in Icelandic”
  •  3:35 Michael Wagner (MIT): “Opaque Complementation and German Word Stress”
  •  4:00 Bay Area German Linguistic Fieldwork Project (UC Berkeley): On the German Language of Civility/Vulgarity: Evidence from Bonn”
  •  7:00 Dinner (Faculty Club: Howard Lounge)
  •  Theo Vennemann (Univ. of Munich): “Semitic Influences on Germanic Language and Society”

Saturday, April 6

  •  Morning Session (Seaborg Room): Werner Abraham (UC Berkeley)
  •  9:00 Ari Hoptman (Univ. of Minnesota): “Possible Remnants of Proto-Germanic Stress in West Germanic Alliterative Verse”
  •  9:25 Donald Steinmetz (Augsburg College): “An OT Approach to German Plurals: Default Hierarchies for Gender and Plural”
  •  9:50 Daniel Richards (Univ. of Michigan): “Compound Numeral Inversion in English”
  •  10:15 Jiri Janko (UC Berkeley): “Delimiting the Dependent Clause Constituency in Old High German”
  •  10:40 Ye-Ok Oh (Chungnam National Univ.): “Untersuchungen der polysemen Ableitungen in der kognitiven Semantik”
  •  11:05 Wayne Harbert (Cornell Univ.): “Toward a Grammar of Germanic: A Status Report”
  •  12:00-1:30 Lunch
  •  Afternoon Session: Robert G. Hoeing (SUNY Buffalo)
  •  1:30 Hans Boas (Univ. of Texas): : “The Role of Semantic classes in Determining Verbal Alternation Patterns: Evidence from English and German Locative Alternations”
  •  1:55 Andre Meinunger (ZAS Berlin/Univ. of Leipzig): “Speech Act Adverbials and a Curiosity with the German ‘Vorfeld’”
  •  2:20 Geoffrey Barker (UC Berkeley): “Intonation in Tyrolean German: A Typological Study of Nuclear Contours”
  •  2:45 “Theres Grüter (McGill Univ.): “How Thomas became ‘Tömu’ and Alfons “Fönsu’: An OT Account of Hypocoristics in Bernese Swiss German”
  •  3:10 John H. McWhorter (UC Berkeley): “What Happened to English?
  •  3:35 Christopher D. Sapp (Indiana Univ.): “The Origins of the Scandinavian s-Passive”"
  •  4:00 Irmengard Rauch (UC Berkeley): “Muscular Gothic”
  •  Cocktails

Contact Information

  • Irmengard Rauch, Department of German at University of California, Berkeley.
  • Phone: (510) 642-2003
  • phone/fax: (707) 746-7480

Lodging

Reservations can be made at:

  • The Faculty Club, UC Berkeley; (510) 642-1993 / (510) 540-5678
  •  The Durant Hotel, 2600 Durant Ave., Berkeley, CA 94704; (510) 845-8981

 The Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable is supported by the University of California Berkeley Center for German and European Studies and the Max Kade Foundation, Inc.

Each year the graduate students of the department organize and host a two-day conference on a specific interdisciplinary theme. The conference offers students and faculty from the U. S. and abroad an opportunity to present their research on such diverse topics as: “Self-Made Germans: Authenticity, Authority and Self-Fashioning” (2001), “The German Soldier” (2000), “Reading Turn-of-the-Century Culture at the Turn of the Century” (1999), “Building Memory: City Space and Urban Experience” (1998), and “Conquering Women: Gender and War” (1997). Our recent conferences have received great praise from faculty and students both at Berkeley and around the country. They familiarize students with all phases of the conference process and provide unique insight into what constitutes an effective abstract and academic presentation.

FINITE SUBJECTS: MORTALITY AND CULTURE IN GERMANY
Tenth Annual Interdisciplinary German Studies Conference
at the University of California at Berkeley, April 5-6, 2002

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: KARL S. GUTHKE

370 Dwinelle Hall Conference Room

Conference Schedule

Friday, April 5th

8:45 Breakfast
9:30 Opening Remarks: Joel Freeman, UC Berkeley
9:50 – 11:10 Aesthetics of Finitude (Moderator: Micheal Cowan)

  • Michele Ricci, Stanford University: “The Sacramentalization of Maximin: Literary Modernism and Stefan George’s Poetics of Mortality”
  • Bruce Barnhart, University of California, Irvine: “Jazz and the Pathos of Distance: Adorno’s Use of Nietzsche”
  • Sam Ishii-Gonzales, New York University: “Death in Fassbinder, or What Remains to be Thought”

11:20 – 12:40 The Sublime made Finite (Moderator: Joel Freeman, UC Berkeley)

  • Timothy Frawley, Georgetown University: “The Death of the Sublime: Kafka and Kant”
  • Eric Baker, University of Minnesota: The Epicurean Sublime of Equipoise: “The Hedonist Undercurrent of 18th-Century Aesthetic Discourse”
  • Arthur Strum, Stanford University: “Finitude through Transcendence: the Ambivalent Legacy of Kant’s Critical “Tribunal”

Lunch 12:40 – 1:40
1:40 – 2:40 Keynote Speaker: Karl S. Guthke, Harvard University, Kuno Franke Professor of German Art and Culture, on “Memory Culture in the Cemetary: Talking Stones or Silent Tombs?”

3:00 – 4:20 Homicide (Moderator: June Hwang, UC Berkeley)

  • Jessica Wood, University of California, Irvine: “Life Unworthy: Power over Life, Death, and Reproduction in Wolfgang Liebeneiner’s “Ich klage an!”
  • Sace Elder, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: “Death in the City: Murder and Modernity in Weimar Germany”
  • Michael S. Bryant, Ohio State University: “Finding Oneself in Death: On the Uses of Mass Murder in Identity Formation”

Saturday April 6th

9:20 – 10:40 Death and the Nation (Moderator: Jennifer Kapzynski, UC Berkeley)

  • Chad Wellmon, UC Berkeley: “Thinking a (Given) Nation”
  • Wendy C. Nielsen, UC Santa Barbara: “Romantic Death: Nationalism and Gender Trouble in Kleist and Günderrode”
  • Robyn Marasco, UC Berkeley: “Violence, Fear and Death in Hegel’s ‘Lordship and Bondage’”

10:50 – 12:20 Transcending Transcendence (Moderator: Christina Gerhardt, University of Wisconsin)

  • Ingo Zechner, Holocaust Victims Information and Support Center: Vienna, Austria: “Der Tod ist ein Meister aus Deutschland – Heideggers Todesfuge”
  • Noga Wizansky, University of California, Berkeley: “Re-enchanting Finitude – Rationalizing Infinity in Weimar Germany: Lotte Reiniger’s Silhouette Film, ‘The Adventures of Prince Achmed’ (1923-1926)”
  • Brendan Quigley, University of California, Irvine: “Das Sein zum Tode: Dasein’s Tragic Heroism and The Aporetic Structure of Death in Being and Time”

12:30 – 1:30 Lunch

1:40 – 3:00 Plenary Speaker: Eric Santner, University of Chicago, Department Chair and Harriet and Ulrich E. Meyer Professor of Modern European Jewish History, Jewish Studies, will speak on “Death and the Neighbor: A Reading of Franz Rosenzweig’s The Star of Redemption”.

3:00 – 4:40 Apparitions

  • Sabine Kriebel, UC Berkeley: “Memory and Mourning: the Legacy of Mass Death in John Heartfield’s Photomontages”
  • Maren Witte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin: “Und nenn es nicht Stillstand” – Gedanken zur Bedeutung von Ruhe und Tod im Tanz des 20. Jahrhunderts.”
  • Maya Maxym, Emory University: “The Fertility of Loss: Paul Celan’s ‘Sprich auch du’ und ‘Vor einer Kerze.’”

Evening Reception

The Seventeenth Annual Meeting of the Semiotic Circle of California will be held in the Faculty Club, on Saturday and Sunday, January 26-27, 2002. As customary, the meeting is an open-topic research paper meeting.

Schedule

  • 8:45 am: Registration (coffee/tea breaks, luncheon, closing pastry / wine): students $20; others $40

Morning Session: Winfried Kudszus (UC Berkeley), Chair

  • 9:00 am Denis J. Brion (Washington & Lee Law School): “Illegitimate Politics in Bush v. Gore”
  • 9:30 am Richard John Ascarate & Tonya Kim Dewey (UC Berkeley): “Cracking the Nut: The Translation of Prose to choreography and Gesture in E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Tales”
  • 10:00 am Scott Simpkins (Univ. of North Texas): “The Romantic Pause” 10:30 am William A. Pencak (Penn State Univ.): “Q. ‘Who’s the Illegal Alien, Pilgrim?’ –A.’The Man who Shot Liberty Valence’”
  • 11:00 am Werner Abraham (UC Berkeley: “Sociopathology and Bateson’s ‘Double Bind’” 11:30 am Alain J.-J. Cohen (UC San Diego): “Semiotics of the Filmic Dissolve in Scorsese’s ‘Taxi Driver’”

Luncheon

Afternoon Session: Alain J.-J. Cohen (UC San Diego), Chair

  • 1:00 pm Ellen McCracken (UC Santa Barbara): “Argentina is Burning: Ostensive Communication and Semiotic Struggle in the Current Socio-Economic Crisis”
  • 1:30 pm Norbert Wiley (UC Berkeley): “The Linguistics of Inner Speech”
  • 2:00 pm Llana Barber (UC Berkeley): “Framing the Avant-Garde: White Oak’s Reconstruction of the Work of the Judson Dance Theater”
  • 2:30 pm Sasha Krivonosov (Penn State Univ.): “Eh-wa-ua-wau-aoooow! The Post-World War II USSR: A Tarzan Generation”
  • 3:00 pm William Watt (UC Irvine)”Writing is a parasitic Representation of Speech, Write?”
  • 3:30 pm Jean-Jacques Boutaud & Pascal Lardellier (Information Science & Communication, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon): “A Semiotic Approach to the Rituals of ‘Commensalité’”