Christine Vais

Christine Vais

PhD Student

cvais@berkeley.edu

Office: 5407 Dwinelle

Office Hours: Wed. & Thurs. 10-11 & by appointment

Christine Vais is a graduate student in Germanic Linguistics. She received her BA in 2011 from the University of California, Berkeley, with a double major in German and Linguistics. In 2014, she received her MA, also from the University of California, Berkeley, in Germanic Linguistics. Her main interest is in the semantic analysis of the Germanic languages from both a synchronic and diachronic point of view, focusing primarily on the semantics of prepositions in the Germanic languages. Christine has been involved with the FrameNet Project since 2011 and the Bay Area German Project since 2012. She was also a co-organizer of the 2014 Graduate Student Conference, "Linguistic Varieties and Variation."

Publications

 

Rauch, Irmengard, Alex Estes, Michael Fragomeni, Carolyn Hawksahw, Chris Little, Stephanie Peltner, Lindsay Preseau, and Christine Vais. "BAG XIII: On Laughter: German and English Jokes." Interdisciplinary Journal for Germanic Linguistics and Semiotic Analysis 19, 2. 2014.

  Recent Presentations

"A Frame-semantic approach to the polysemy of prepositions: the case of Middle Dutch na", Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable, University of California, Berkeley, April 4, 2014.

 

“BAG XIII: On Laughter: German and English Jokes” Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable, University of California, Berkeley, CA, April 4, 2014 (with Alex Estes, Michael Fragomeni, Carolyn Hawkshaw, Chris Little, Stephanie Peltner, and Lindsay Preseau).

 

"Giving the Basket and Cultural Exchange" GLAC (Germanic Linguistics Annual Conference), Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. May 8, 2015 (with Roslyn Burns, UC Berkeley Linguistics).

Recent Courses

Elementary German 1 (Fall 2013, Summer 2014)

Elementary German 2 (Spring 2014, Fall 2015)

Intermediate German 1 (Fall 2014)

Intermediate German 2 (Spring 2015)

Research Areas

Germanic Linguistics, Frame Semantics, Corpus Linguistics, Historical Linguistics, Semantic Change, Construction Grammar, Polysemy, Cognitive Linguistics, Old High German, Old English